Tuesday 21st of November 2017 | Spanish | English

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ELIZABETH ROJAS LEVI: ECUADORIAN LOOKING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR

Elizabeth Rojas, is Ecuadorian by birth. She came to the United States at the end of high school. For her, education has always been her number one priority, which led her to pursue a Bachelor’s degree at the University of Florida in Economics and Political Science. While there, her interest in infrastructure and communications was born and grew stronger while interning at Petrobras in Brazil.

Elizabeth currently works in the private sector, as Director of Public Affairs for the Americas region at Alcatel. Her responsibilities include overseeing corporate image and branding and government relations. Aside from her job, Elizabeth devotes her time to politics, advocating for women’s participation in federal government. Thanks to her experience as Deputy Director of Federal Affairs in Florida, she entered the world of politics and now holds a board position at RightNOW Women PAC, a volunteer organization for women’s participation in the political sphere.

Throughout her career track, a major challenge Elizabeth faced was having to provide financial assistance to her family. However, she says, “that experience helped shape the woman I am today.” It was this challenge that convinced her that only education could provide a better future for her and her family. This experience was the driving force in motivating her to go back to school to pursue an Executive Masters of Business Administration at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

Elizabeth’s long-term goal is to provide opportunities for women in the education, technology and political fields so that they can fully develop their professional capacities. Elizabeth was born and raised in Guayaquil, and she strongly believes that her Ecuadorian roots have helped her get ahead. “Being Ecuadorian has been the key to my success. Being Ecuadorian to me means being open, tenacious, and creative. I am able to bring people together, a crucial quality in both business and politics,” says Rojas.

The advice that Elizabeth has for other young Latinos seeking success in the United States is to participate in politics and educate themselves. She also encourages them take advantage of every opportunity and to find mentors that will help guide them in their professional development. Her most beloved Ecuadorian tradition is “año viejo” and she deeply misses Ecuadorian ceviche.